Repeating Number IP Addresses

April 30, 2018 at 10:40 am (interesting, internet) (, )

Google started a bit of a trend when it released its own DNS service on IP address 8.8.8.8.

The thing about a DNS service, is that when you want someone to be able to use it, they need to know how to configure it.  But you can’t use a nice memorable name, as the whole point of a DNS service is to translate names into IP addresses.  So you have to configure your DNS service using the IP address alone, hence Google finding a way to secure ownership of the 8.8.8.8 address for use with DNS, landing them a nice, easy to remember address.

Now, more recently, the Quad9 DNS service has been launched, promising more privacy and performance, on, you guessed it, 9.9.9.9.  And in the last month or so Cloudflare and APNIC have teamed up to bring you the 1.1.1.1 DNS service, again promising privacy and performance.

So this got me wondering – who might be next?  Well if you’re after memorable IP addresses, then repeated numbers is definitely the way to go, so after a quick bit of typing into an IP address lookup tool, how about some of these?

  • 2.2.2.2 – Orange Telecom
  • 3.3.3.3 – Amazon
  • 4.4.4.4 – Level 3 Communications
  • 5.5.5.5 – E-Plus Mobilfunk GmbH & Co KG
  • 6.6.6.6 – USAISC – looks like US Army
  • 7.7.7.7 – Dept of Defense

And of course we know about 1, 8 and 9.  I’m not interested really in 10, but going for other repeats:

  • 11.11.11.11 – US DoD again
  • 22.22.22.22 – And this one too …
  • 33.33.33.33 – And this one …
  • 44.44.44.44 – US Amateur Radio Digital Communications
  • 55.55.55.55 – USAISC again
  • 66.66.66.66 – Time Warner Cable Internet LLC
  • 77.77.77.77 – Dadeh Gostar Asr Novin P.J.S. Co. (with an address in Iran)
  • 88.88.88.88 – Telenor Business Solutions AS (Norway)
  • 99.99.99.99 – AT&T
  • 111.111.111.111 – KDDI (Japan)
  • 222.222.222.222 – China Telecom

So the US military certainly has ownership of the largest number of repeated number addresses.  But there are also a fair number of telcos and large Internet companies in there too (will we eventually see an Amazon DNS service on 3.3.3.3 I wonder?).

Of course if you were running a universal query answering service, then the best address would have to be 42.42.42.42, which appears to be owned by South Korea Telecom.

But I dread to think what running a single service on any of these specific public addresses would do to the global routing table.

Of course you need to beware of hidden meaning in all this … although taken to extremes it reminds me of the interesting number paradox.

I quite like this idea:

When you see the number 111 stop and look around yourself. Take a note of where you are, what you are doing and who you are with! 111 is a wakeup call from the Universe, telling you to pay attention to what is happening around you.

That’s not a bad premise for a DNS service – as a reminder to pay attention to the real world.

Kevin

 

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