Dual ScrollPhatHD 17×14 LED Array

January 13, 2019 at 12:31 pm (computers) (, , , , , )

Having now had a play with my ScrollPhatHDs with the Arduino I’ve now successfully linked two together via a TCA9548A breakout board (having solved my Weird Multi-I2C Bus Issues as previously described).

The ultimate aim was to make a self-contained unit containing two ScrollPhatHD boards, an Arduino Nano and the TCA9584A.  I’ve now managed that using a square piece of breadboard, various jumper wires and most importantly, the Pimoroni Pogo-a-go-go Solderless header pins – I just didn’t want to spoil the neat look of the ScrollPhatHD’s by soldering to them directly.  The Pogo-pins are just perfect for spring-loaded connections between the ScrollPhatHDs and breadboard.

The one quirk, is that if I wanted all boards nicely sandwiched between the ScrollPhatHDs and the breadboard, but wanted to use the pogo-pins, then the breadboard needs to be strip-side up.

Here is the plan, followed by some photos of the finished item.

scrollphat-breakout_bb

I’ve left the nano and tca breakout off, so I can see the tracks.  This was from a first experiment with the two Phats, so it already had three full height sets of cuts in tracks – hence the few places where there were a couple of bits of patching to do, which were just done with solder links.  There are a few pins added to support the nano, especially at the USB end where I’ll be plugging in and out, which aren’t connected to anything on the stripboard.  And the four pins highlighted for the two ScrollPhat’s themselves weren’t soldered pins – that is the location for the pogo-pins.

In the final board, I put the jumper wires on the underside, and used headers pushed right through from below.  I also added a reset switch (not shown in the plan) wired to the Nano RST and ground on the strip board.

The linking of the two Phats isn’t perfect – the Nano USB port is just a fraction too high to perfectly fit, meaning the two boards bow out slightly in the middle.  Note the use of the pogo-pins.  I could replace them all with a slightly longer stand-off, but this is fine for a prototype.

Also, I made sure to drop some insulating tape on the bottom of both the Nano and the TCA board, to make sure it wouldn’t short anything on the copper of the stripboard.  I also put a bit around the shield of the USB port just in case, but I don’t think there was anything conductive on the back of the Phat.

So I now have a USB-accessible, self-contained, programmable 17×14 LED array.

Software wise, this uses the modified Adafruit IS31FL3731 Library I mentioned before, with the added quirk that one of the boards needs the coordinates reversing.  Coupled with the need to switch boards using the TCA as well, this means the basic idea of using the board is as follows:

#include <Wire.h>
#include <Adafruit_GFX.h>
#include <ScrollPhat_IS31FL3731.h>

// ScrollPhats connected using a TCA9548A I2C Multiplexer
// These are the I2C bus numbers used
#define TCAONE       0
#define TCATWO       1

//  HOR = number in horizontal (x) plane
//  VER = number in vertical (y) plane
#define HOR 17
#define VER 14

// Scrollphats have a hardcoded I2C address.
// Assumes connected as follows:
//      ledmatrix1 - using SC0 via the TCA
//      ledmatrix2 - using SC1 via the TCA
ScrollPhat_IS31FL3731 ledmatrix1 = ScrollPhat_IS31FL3731();
ScrollPhat_IS31FL3731 ledmatrix2 = ScrollPhat_IS31FL3731();

#define TCAADDR 0x70
void tcaselect(uint8_t i) {
  if (i > 7) return;
 
  Wire.beginTransmission(TCAADDR);
  Wire.write(1 << i);
  Wire.endTransmission();  
}

void setup () {
  // Initialse the I2C handling
  Wire.begin();
  
  tcaselect(TCAONE);
  ledmatrix1.begin();
  tcaselect(TCATWO);
  ledmatrix2.begin();
    
  // Do something to initialse your pixel array
}

void loop () {
  // Do stuff on your pixel array
  // Don't forget to write the displayRead(x,y) function
  // used in the scan routine

  ScanDisplay();
}

// Note: you need to implement the displayRead (x,y) function
//      to determine if a pixel is on or off
//
void ScanDisplay () {
  // Scan the first matrix
  tcaselect(TCAONE);
  for (uint8_t x=0; x<HOR; x++) {
    for (uint8_t y=0; y<VER/2; y++) {
      if (displayRead (x, y)) {
        ledmatrix1.drawPixel(x, y, 64);
      } else {
        ledmatrix1.drawPixel(x, y, 0);
      }
    }
  }

  // Scan the second matrix
  // Note this is oriented 180 degrees, so reverse both
  // x and y prior to setting, also of course, only using
  // the second half of the pixel array to display here.
  tcaselect(TCATWO);
  for (uint8_t x=0; x<HOR; x++) {
    for (uint8_t y=0; y<VER/2; y++) {
      if (displayRead (HOR-x-1, VER/2-1-y+VER/2)) {
        ledmatrix2.drawPixel(x, y, 64);
      } else {
        ledmatrix2.drawPixel(x, y, 0);
      }
    }
  }
}

 

Kevin

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