More Windows (8) Update Woes

August 11, 2019 at 10:09 am (computers) (, , , )

That really nice Acer Iconia W510 tablet that I had such fun with before has started playing up again.  It isn’t clear from the wisdom of the Internet if I could put Windows 10 on it or not, but I did wonder if it was worth seeing if the free update was still working or not.  I haven’t yet, but the Windows 8.1 updates seem to have stopped again and I get a range of errors popping up, 0x800F0831 seems a favourite this time.  Apparently this isn’t in the list of common corruption errors, but, well, this is Windows, so who knows!?  It seems to be related to some kind of mismatch in applying updates.

I did wonder if it was getting too full (there is only 32GB onboard storage, and only around 1GB free) and so managed to get itself in a mess.  This post is by way of documenting some of the more useful suggestions I’ve found online for dealing with Windows update issues as I’ve tried to sort my issues out.

There does seem a ‘standard’ but complicated procedure for resetting Windows update (assuming the built-in troubleshooting doesn’t do any good).  There are two helpful Powershell scripts available here that can do all this for you, alongside details of all the manual steps involved too.  The only issue I found was that I had to temporarily change the signed execution policy to allow them to run.

In a “run as administrator” Powershell prompt, I had to do:

Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Scope Process

Before running the script.  The slacking of policy should only be temporary (unlike some other suggestions I’ve seen which change it permanently).  Once the script has run, a reboot is required to kick everything off again.

Still no go for me though. Next up is some advice about using the tools sfc and dism – that’s the “system file checker” and “deployment image servicing and management” tools.  Full details of what they do can be found here and from Microsoft here, but the summary is:

sfc /scannow
dism.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Scanhealth
dism.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth

That will do some basic checks of the running system image (sfc); check the health of the  running instance (dism /Scanhealth) and then repair it if required (/Restorehealth) using the online Windows Update servers as the reference source material. Nothing says this, but I assume you need to run sfc again after the two uses of dism, otherwise I’m not sure what the actual point is!  The /Online means “target the running operating system” rather than an actual file or other partition containing a non-running Windows image.

By the way if dism gets stuck at 20% or 40% apparently this is quite common – you’ll have to wait it out.  Eventually it will jump to 100% complete.

If your system is too corrupt then it looks like you can use dism from a working Windows installation to repair the image of a broken one or specify an alternative source of known good files if the link to Windows Update isn’t doing it for you.  I downloaded the 32-bit Windows 8.1 installation ISO from the MS download site and then dropped it onto a USB memory stick so it can be mounted from the tablet.

To specify a new reference source, use the switches /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth /Source to specify a known good source of files.  You need to point to \sources\install.wim from the mounted ISO image.  It is also worth using /LimitAccess to stop it phoning home to Windows Update and using the Windows Update client.  More details again here.

It may be that this would have helped my Windows 10 boot problems I described before.

Kevin

 

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1 Comment

  1. Acer Iconia W510 Windows 8.1 Reinstall | Kevin's Blog said,

    […] quite sure why I’m persevering with this one, but it is quite a nice machine!  But as I mentioned last time, it is full and has stopped updating.  So time has come to re-install and conventional wisdom on […]

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