Raspberry Pi Family Tree

December 8, 2018 at 10:44 pm (computers) ()

There are a number of pages around listing the history of the various models of Raspberry Pi, and a few photo galleries of all models, but so far I haven’t been able to find an actual evolutionary family tree of the various boards produced to date.  So I’ve created one which will do until I find a better one.

Sources:

And the images themselves were picked out from Alex of Raspi.tv’s Raspberry Pi Family photo from March 2018:

(with the manual addition of the 3A+)

I think I’ve got the right linkages, but if not let me know.  Anything with a line across to the right hand side is still listed (at the time of writing) as a live product on raspberrypi.org as far as I can see.

Kevin

Raspberry Pi Family Tree.png

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8×7 LED Array and MCP23017

December 7, 2018 at 8:21 pm (computers) (, , , , , , )

I can’t resist playing with an LED array, especially a surface mount one, so when I stumbled across some cheap (<$2) surface mount 8×7 LED arrays, charlieplexed onto 8 IO pins on ebay, I had to grab some.

Now I should say, I can’t really imagine why anyone would bother doing what I’m about to describe, as you already have many other options, including:

But as I say, I can’t resist a surface mount LED board, so I started to play.  When these arrived and I started poking around, I soon found out they were actually a cheap knock-off of the Sparkfun 8×7 LED Array, something I didn’t even know existed!  Apologies to Sparkfun for not getting an official board, but many thanks to them for open sourcing the design.

Initially they are fairly easy to hook-up and drive.  I used an Arduino Uno for my first experiments, as they could be paired straight away with pins 2-9 and then driven directly using the Arduino Charlieplex library (the Sparkfun Tutorial uses the Chaplex library and a special Sparkfun library for the board, but I was just doing fairly simple things for now).

With the neat serial interface to the Pi-Lite in the back of my mind, I wanted a better way to connect to the board.  Ideally, something that could be soldered onto the back to make it a single unit.  Some options I explored were:

  • Using an IO expander – such as the MCP23017 (the subject of this post).
  • Using an Arduino Mini Pro – to provide a serial interface (bit more on that later).
  • Using an LED driver module.

For this first experiment, I thought having an I2C addressable LED module would be quite neat (I didn’t know about the IS31FL3731 used on the Adafruit and Pimoroni boards at this time – that is an experiment for another day), so I grabbed some cheap MCP23017 breakout boards and after breadboarding it, ended up simply soldering one on the back.  It overlaps ever so slightly, but I think I could still place a few of these side by side to chain them.

2018-12-01-16-06-19.jpg2018-12-01-16-04-34.jpg2018-12-01-16-04-20.jpg

Link-up wise, this ties the 8 IO pins of the matrix to port A pins 0 to 7 on the MCP23017.  The 7 pins with header connections are (in order top to bottom):

  • VCC
  • GND
  • SCL/SCK
  • SDA/SI
  • NC/CS
  • NC/SO
  • RESET

And the three connections with no header pins are the three address encoding pins.  As I’m using I2C I only need four connections: VCC, GND, SCL and SDA (I could have left off the other three header pins really).

In terms of the code, there are libraries for the MCP23017, Charlieplexing and even the aforementioned Sparkfun library for this module, but to link them all together is quite inefficient.  The simple approach would be to replace the low-level pin setting/clearing code in the charlieplex library with commands for the MCP23017.  But as every setting of a single LED, even when triggered as part of a ‘scan’ managing a display buffer, requires I2C commands to be sent over the bus, and each command requires bit manipulation to process the IO pins individually, this is massively inefficient.

However, the MCP23017 is really only be driven by two registers: GPIOA to set the IO pins HIGH or LOW, and IODIRA to set the pins to INPUT or OUTPUT.  Recall that for Charlieplexing, all three states of pins are significant: INPUT, OUTPUT+HIGH, OUTPUT+LOW.

To work out which pins do what, we need to refer to the wiring layout of the LEDs on the board, for which the Sparkfun schematic is key (my thanks again for the open source design).  Here is an annotated version showing which IO pins (numbered 1 to 8 on the schematic) are connected to which LED in the matrix.

2018-12-07-19-29-34.jpg

The key thing to notice is how for every column listed, there is, naturally, a gap in the numbering of the rows (you can’t have an LED connected with both leads to the same IO pin).

So a more efficient scanning algorithm would thus run something like this:

// IODIRA = INPUT (1) or OUTPUT (0)
// GPIOA  = HIGH (1) or LOW (0)

FOREACH col (0 to 7)  // scan one column at a time
  gpiomask = (1<<col) // only pin that is HIGH in the col pin
  dirmask = 0         // default to all OUTPUTS
  FOREACH iopin (0 to 7)
    led = iopin
    IF (iopin == col) SKIP
    IF (iopin > col) THEN
       // led we want is one less than iopin due to charlieplex mapping
    IF (led for col is OFF) THEN
       dirmask |= (1<<iopin)  // set this one to an INPUT i.e. OFF
  NEXT iopin
  IODIRA = dirmask
  GPIOA  = gpiomask
NEXT col

The basic principle being that for a single scan, set one pin HIGH/OUTPUT (for one column in the matrix) and then work out which other LEDs need to be active by setting the direction of the pins accordingly – LOW/OUTPUT will light the LED for that pin combination; INPUT will mean the led for that combination is off.  Then on the next scan, do the same for the next column.

The following is some basic code, based on a whole range of sources (and to be honest, not particularly well structured in terms of functional separation) to provide an I2C optimised scanning function for the MCP23017 and LED array combination.

Usual caveats apply – I’m not really a cpp person, use at your own risk, etc, etc.

Key gotchas from doing this:

  • You can set the I2C bus to run at a higher speed, which is well worth doing in this case.  Note that I don’t know what happens if you have lots of things on the bus – this was working with just this LED array and nothing else.  See Wire.SetClock() in the Arduino Wire library.
  • You can’t do I2C from an interrupt routine.  I wanted the scanning routine to run off a timer interrupt, but nothing works if you try to do that – in fact, everything actually completely locks up.

So that’s it for now.  It scans quite well and with not a bad refresh rate, but as I said right at the start, with so many options of LED array available, not quite sure why anyone would want to do this.

Next, I’ll see if I can get the Pi-Lite firmware onto an Arduino Pro Mini and solder that on the back of one of these too.  That will create a standalone, drivable over serial port, module similar to the original Pi-Lite (ish).  Not really sure why anyone would want to do that either.

Kevin

I2CCharlieExample.ino

/*
 * Charlieplex Example for the Sparkfun LED Array board connected
 * to an MCP23017 IO expander chip and accessed via I2C.
 */
#include "I2CCharlieplex.h"
#include "Wire.h" // required for I2CCharlieplex.h

#define MCPADDR  0   // 0 to 7 for 0x20 to 0x27 for MCP23017 expander

// Define the pins in the order you want to address them.
//
// Note: for the MCP23017, pin numbers are as follows:
//         Port A pins 0 to 7 = pins 0 to 7
//         Port B pins 0 to 7 = pins 8 to 15
//
#define NUMBER_OF_PINS 8
byte pins[] = {0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7};

I2CCharlieplex charlieplex = I2CCharlieplex(MCPADDR, pins, NUMBER_OF_PINS);

void setup(){
  charlieplex.init();
  charlieplex.clr();
  charlieplex.scan();
}

int x=0;
int y=0;
int scan=0;
int clr=0;

void loop(){
  delay(1);
  charlieplex.scan();

  // Update the LED pattern from time to time
  if (scan > 200) {
    scan = 0;

    if (clr) {
      charlieplex.clr();
      clr=0;
    } else {
      charlieplex.led (x, y, HIGH);
      x++;
      if (x>=8) {
        x=0;
        y++;
        if (y>=7) {
          y=0;
          clr=1;
        }
      }
    }
  }
  scan++;
}

I2CCharliePlex.cpp

/*
 * I2C MCP23017 I2C IO Expander Charlieplex
 * Based on elements of MCP23017 Library from Adafruit and
 * the Charlieplex library by Alexander Brevig
 *
 * Pins are numbered as follows:
 *   0-7  Port A 0-7
 *   8-15 Port B 0-7
 */

#include "I2CCharlieplex.h"
#include "Wire.h"

// Default address
#define MCP23017_ADDRESS 0x20

// registers (using same definitions as Adafruit_MCP23017.h)
// Note: MCP23017 can be configured for interleaving registers or
//       sequential, depending on the setting of IOCON[AB].BANK.
//       By default on power up IOCON.BANK = 0; i.e. interleaved
//       as defined below..
#define MCP23017_IODIRA 0x00
#define MCP23017_IPOLA 0x02
#define MCP23017_GPINTENA 0x04
#define MCP23017_DEFVALA 0x06
#define MCP23017_INTCONA 0x08
#define MCP23017_IOCONA 0x0A
#define MCP23017_GPPUA 0x0C
#define MCP23017_INTFA 0x0E
#define MCP23017_INTCAPA 0x10
#define MCP23017_GPIOA 0x12
#define MCP23017_OLATA 0x14

#define MCP23017_IODIRB 0x01
#define MCP23017_IPOLB 0x03
#define MCP23017_GPINTENB 0x05
#define MCP23017_DEFVALB 0x07
#define MCP23017_INTCONB 0x09
#define MCP23017_IOCONB 0x0B
#define MCP23017_GPPUB 0x0D
#define MCP23017_INTFB 0x0F
#define MCP23017_INTCAPB 0x11
#define MCP23017_GPIOB 0x13
#define MCP23017_OLATB 0x15

#define MCP23017_INT_ERR 255

// Address in range 0 to 7.  MCP23017 address set in the range
//  0x20 to 0x27 using the A0, A1, A2 pins
I2CCharlieplex::I2CCharlieplex(uint8_t address, byte* userPins, byte numberOfUserPins){
  pins = userPins;
  numberOfPins = numberOfUserPins;

  // Initialise the MCP23017 IO Expander using I2C
  if (address > 7) {
    addr = MCP23017_ADDRESS;  // default to first address if not sure
  } else {
    addr = MCP23017_ADDRESS + address;
  }
}

void I2CCharlieplex::init () {
  Wire.begin();  // We are the bus master

  // Note on I2C clock speed - as a synchronous comms, the clock is set
  // by the master and the slave will be triggered by it.
  // The default is 100kbit/s (standard); many devices will also support 400kbit/s (full speed).
  // Some might support 1Mbit/s (fast mode) or 3.2Mbit/s (high speed).
  // See https://www.i2c-bus.org/speed/
  //
  // 400000 bps is 400000/8 = 50 KB/s
  Wire.setClock(400000); // Use I2C in full speed mode

  // Clear all leds (set all pins to INPUT)
  mcpAllInputs();
}

// LED Buffer access routines
void I2CCharlieplex::led(uint8_t x, uint8_t y, bool state) {
  if ((x<NUMXLEDS) && (y<NUMYLEDS)) {
    if (state == HIGH) {
      leds[y] |= (1<<x);
    } else {
      leds[y] &= ~(1<<x);
    }
  }
}

void I2CCharlieplex::clr() {
  for (uint8_t i=0; i<NUMYLEDS; i++) {
    leds[i] = 0;
  }
}

// WARNING: This cannot be called from an ISR if it is using I2C
//          (everything locks up if you do)
void I2CCharlieplex::scan() {
  // Only scan one column at a time

  // Scan according to the following algorithm:
  //  IODIRA = INPUT (1) or OUTPUT (0)
  //  GPIOA  = HIGH (1) or LOW (0)
  //  
  //  FOREACH col (0 to 7)  // scan one column at a time
  //    gpiomask = (1<<col) // only pin that is HIGH in the col led
  //    dirmask = 0         // default to all OUTPUTS
  //    FOREACH iopin (0 to 7)
  //      IF (iopin == col) SKIP
  //      IF (iopin > col) THEN
  //         led we want is one less than iopin due to charlieplex mapping
  //      IF (led for col is OFF) THEN
  //         dirmask |= (1<<iopin)  // set this one to an INPUT i.e. OFF
  //    NEXT iopin
  //    IODIRA = dirmask
  //    GPIOA  = gpiomask
  //  NEXT col

  // First kill all LEDS
  mcpWrite(MCP23017_IODIRA,0xff);

  uint8_t ledmask = (1<<col);
  uint8_t dirmask = 0;
  for (uint8_t p=0; p<NUMPINS; p++) {
    uint8_t y = p;
    if (p == col) {
      // skip this one
      continue;
    } else if (p > col) {
      // LED index will be one less than pin value due to charlieplex pattern
      y--;
    }
    // check the 'col'th LED in each 'y' row to see if pin 'p' is IN or OUT
    if ((leds[y] & (1<<col)) == 0) {
      // Want IO pin to be low to illuminate the LED
      // So only set IO pin if LED is OFF
      dirmask |= (1<<p);
    }
  }
  // Always need "col" pin as an OUTPUT (low) though
  dirmask &= ~(1<<col);
  
  // Only High pin will be the col being scanned
  mcpWrite (MCP23017_GPIOA, ledmask);
  // All other pins are low, so direction will determine if they are
  // a low OUTPUT or INPUT (which will disable that LED)
  mcpWrite (MCP23017_IODIRA, dirmask);
  // next column
  col++;
  if (col >= NUMXLEDS) {
    col = 0;
  }
}

// I2C MCP23017 IO Handling
// Not: No DigitalRead as yet

void I2CCharlieplex::mcpPinMode (uint8_t p, uint8_t mode) {
  if (mode == INPUT) {
    // Set appropriate bit in register
    mcpBitUpdate(p, 1, pin2reg(p, MCP23017_IODIRA, MCP23017_IODIRB));
  } else {
    // Clear appropriate bit in register
    mcpBitUpdate(p, 0, pin2reg(p, MCP23017_IODIRA, MCP23017_IODIRB));
  }
}

void I2CCharlieplex::mcpAllInputs () {
    // Set all pins to INPUT at once
    // (makes a full clear much quicker than setting individual bits)
    mcpWrite(MCP23017_IODIRA,0xff);
    mcpWrite(MCP23017_IODIRB,0xff);
}

void I2CCharlieplex::mcpDigitalWrite (uint8_t p, uint8_t val) {
  // Need to read current I/O states from the latch,
  // set/clear the appropriate bit and
  // write it back to the GPIO register
  uint8_t io;
  io = mcpRead(pin2reg(p, MCP23017_OLATA, MCP23017_OLATB));
  bitWrite(io, pin2bit(p), val);
  mcpWrite(pin2reg(p, MCP23017_GPIOA, MCP23017_GPIOB), io);
}

//
// I2C MCP23017 Register Handling
//

void I2CCharlieplex::mcpWrite(uint8_t reg, uint8_t val) {
  // Write sequence:
  //    Send register address to write
  //    Send the byte of data
  Wire.beginTransmission(addr);
  Wire.write(reg);
  Wire.write(val);
  Wire.endTransmission();
}

uint8_t I2CCharlieplex::mcpRead(uint8_t reg) {
  // Read sequence:
  //    Send register address to read
  //    Request 1 byte of data from the device
  //    Read the byte of data
  Wire.beginTransmission(addr);
  Wire.write(reg);
  Wire.endTransmission();
  Wire.requestFrom(addr, (uint8_t)1);
  return Wire.read();
}

void I2CCharlieplex::mcpBitUpdate (uint8_t bit, uint8_t val, uint8_t reg) {
  uint8_t regval;
  regval = mcpRead(reg);
  bitWrite(regval,bit, val);
  mcpWrite(reg, regval);
}

// Register and pin helper functions
uint8_t I2CCharlieplex::pin2bit(uint8_t pin){
  // Returns bit 0 to 7 for range of pins 0 to 7 and pins 8 to 15
  return pin%8;
}
uint8_t I2CCharlieplex::pin2reg(uint8_t pin, uint8_t portAaddr, uint8_t portBaddr){
  if (pin < 8) {
    return portAaddr;
  } else {
    return portBaddr;
  }
}

I2CCharlieplex.h

#ifndef I2CCHARLIEPLEX_H
#define I2CCHARLIEPLEX_H

#include <Arduino.h>

class I2CCharlieplex {

// LED matrix is 8 across by 7 deep
// Wired up in a charlieplex mode to map to 8 IO pins
#define NUMXLEDS 8
#define NUMYLEDS 7
#define NUMPINS  8

public:
  I2CCharlieplex(uint8_t address, byte* userPins,byte numberOfUserPins);
  void init ();

  // LED buffer handler functions
  void led(uint8_t x, uint8_t y, bool state);
  void clr();
  void scan();

  // MCP23017 handler functions
  void    mcpPinMode(uint8_t p, uint8_t mode);
  void    mcpAllInputs();
  void    mcpDigitalWrite(uint8_t p, uint8_t val);
  void    mcpWrite(uint8_t reg, uint8_t val);
  uint8_t mcpRead(uint8_t reg);
  void    mcpBitUpdate (uint8_t bit, uint8_t val, uint8_t reg);
  uint8_t pin2bit(uint8_t pin);
  uint8_t pin2reg(uint8_t pin, uint8_t portAaddr, uint8_t portBaddr);

private:
  byte    numberOfPins;
  byte*   pins;
  uint8_t addr;
  uint8_t leds[NUMYLEDS];
  uint8_t col;
};

#endif

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Extractivism and the Anatomy of AI

November 6, 2018 at 10:20 pm (computers, interesting, science) (, , , )

I found this fascinating website – the Anatomy of an AI System – which takes an Amazon Echo and attempts to map out the behind the scenes costs in terms of manual labour, material resources, and data required to power the ecosystem.

It is particularly telling how much it focuses on the raw material impact of our modern lifestyles, which when all said and done is not unique to the Echo, but a symptom of our continued fascination with electronic gadgetry in its totality.  It has a word, that was new to me, for the way much of the impact is continually hidden from end consumers by large companies – extractivism – and attempts to bring to the fore the continued extractivism going on in support of the huge technology base being created (and in some cases just as quickly obsoleted) by large technology companies.

It uses as one example, The Salar, which is a high plateau in Bolivia that apparently contains the majority of the world’s source for Lithium, becoming increasingly important of course in our desire for mobile power (both smartphones and electric vehicles).

Another interesting example is the metaphor of “the cloud”:

Vincent Mosco has shown how the ethereal metaphor of ‘the cloud’ for offsite data management and processing is in complete contradiction with the physical realities of the extraction of minerals from the Earth’s crust and dispossession of human populations that sustain its existence.

We think of putting our data in “the cloud”, of using services in “the cloud” and all the mechanics are abstracted away, out of sight, out of mind. It is rarely that the physical realities of “the cloud” surface, expect in exceptional circumstances, usually where something goes wrong.

I would be interested in reading an update to Andrew Blum’s Tubes, updating it to make “the cloud” real in the same way he did for the also ethereal Internet itself.

Another interesting observation to come out of the study is the importance of the multiple roles of the end user:

When a human engages with an Echo, or another voice-enabled AI device, they are acting as much more than just an end-product consumer. It is difficult to place the human user of an AI system into a single category: rather, they deserve to be considered as a hybrid case. Just as the Greek chimera was a mythological animal that was part lion, goat, snake and monster, the Echo user is simultaneously a consumer, a resource, a worker, and a product.

(emphasis in the original paper).

This also comes out in the scale of income distributions – with Jeff Bezos at the top (apparently earning $275 million a day) – through US developers and workers, through overseas developers and workers – right down to “unpaid user labour” at the bottom generating the data that feeds the system and continually improves it.

The study rightly points out the fractal nature of attempting to display any of this in a linear manner on a single diagram.  Of course, each supply chain is supported by components each with their own supply chain.  Its supply chains all the way down until you reach the raw elements.

In summary I am minded simultaneously of Carl Sagan:

“We live in a society exquisitely dependent on science and technology, in which hardly anyone knows anything about science and technology.”

But seeing this complication laid bare, somewhat in defence of humanity, also of Douglas Adams (from “Mostly Harmless”):

“The available worlds looked pretty grim. They had little to offer him because he had little to offer them. He had been extremely chastened to realize that although he originally came from a world which had cars and computers and ballet and Armagnac, he didn’t, by himself, know how any of it worked. He couldn’t do it. Left to his own devices he couldn’t build a toaster. He could just about make a sandwich and that was it.”

Kevin

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ESP01 and SSD1306 OLED from myiot

September 30, 2018 at 9:59 am (computers) (, , , )

Not sure where I found the link to these, but this is a neat little board from Ian Sexton – see http://myiot.co.uk/ESP_OLED/.  I ordered four of these and sourced all the parts from ebay.

Here are a few notes on getting them up and running.

  1. You have to be able to hand solder the two capacitors and power regulator SMT devices.  I’d not done this before, so it was a little tricky at first.  No real tips to offer I’m afraid, other than it was worth it, these are really neat boards!
  2. As Ian mentioned, be sure to find an OLED screen labelled VCC-GND-SCL-SDA.  When I was looking, pretty much all of the ones I found were GND-VCC-SCL-SDA.
  3. My displays came with headers pre-soldered, so I couldn’t follow the build order exactly.  Instead using straight 4-pin female headers rather than right angle headers, and then bending them over after solder the OLED on last.
  4. I also found that the ESP01 modules worked best with a small header spacer rather than no spacer as described in Ian’s instructions.  And I added an additional header space to the OLED headers too and used a bit of insulating tape between the OLED and ESP module.
  5. I also found that if I didn’t trim off the ESP 01 module pins, there was still enough of them sticking out that I could still plug them into the 8-pin header of my USB programmer, so actually didn’t need the 5 programming pins included on the board.

The end result for me wasn’t quite as thin as in Ian’s photos, but I is quite a nice compromise between my skills, future usability and utility of the boards.

When it comes to use, you can use the standard ESP/OLED libraries as described in this blog: https://randomnerdtutorials.com/esp8266-0-96-inch-oled-display-with-arduino-ide/

Note however, that this board is wired as follows (which is written on the PCB diagram on Ian’s blog, but it took me a while to find it!):

SCL = GPIO2 (D3 for many ESP boards)
SDA = GPIO0 (D5 for many ESP boards)

These are the opposite way around to most examples in the ssd1306 library.  Also, as I was building for a generic ESP8266, D3 and D5 were not defined anyway, so the example code in, for example, the SSD1306ClockDemo, to initialise the run on the boards was as follows:

// Include the correct display library
// For a connection via I2C using Wire include
#include   // Only needed for Arduino 1.6.5 and earlier
#include "SSD1306Wire.h" // legacy include: #include "SSD1306.h"​ #define SDA 0 // D5 = GPIO0 #define SCL 2 // D3 = GPIO2 // Initialize the OLED display using Wire library SSD1306Wire display(0x3c, SDA, SCL);

In summary, these are really great little boards and the resulting modules I think have a lot of applications.

Kevin.

 

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Fixing Windows 10 Boot Problems

June 29, 2018 at 9:19 pm (computers) (, , , )

Had an issue with a Windows 10 laptop where it stopped booting.  It was failing at the flashing cursor on a black screen, which to me looked like either a disk failure or some odd boot loop.  It wasn’t registering that there wasn’t an OS and it wasn’t trying to boot an OS and finding errors.

Booting off a Windows repair CD didn’t get anywhere with startup repair either, so into the command line I had to go.

There are a number of Windows commands that relate to boot that came into play:

diskpart – to look at disks and partitions to work out how it is configured (using the commands “list disk”, “select disk 0”, “list partition”, “list volume”, etc)

bootsect – to fix the boot sector (in this case, I used “bootsect /nt60 sys”)

bootrec – to fix various boot and boot record issues – “bootrec /fixmbr”, “bootrec /fixboot”, and finally “bootrec /rebuildbcd”.

Unfortunately rebuildbcd (bcd = boot configuration data) generated an error, “the file or directory is corrupted and unreadable”.  So after a bit of Googling, then also found bcdboot.  This is supposed to setup the boot environment by copying the relevant files form the Windows installation over to the boot area.  Running that though, came up with more errors, so poking around in the two areas, the PC had a boot partition on C: and the system drive was D:.  It was attempting to copy from d:\windows\boot\pcat to c:\boot and failing for some reason.

So at this point, I thought a chkdsk might have been in order – so “chkdsk /f c:” came up with a load of index errors related to all the language files which it seemed to fix.  bcdboot was still struggling, so I manually copied the rest of the files over.

At this point bcdboot largely succeeded, but still had one error, so running it in verbose mode highlighted a problem accessing the bcd catalogue from the d:/windows/system32/config area.  But not really knowing what it was trying to do with it, in the end I just ran “bootrec /rebuildbcd” and that seemed to work fine this time.

At this point, we felt it worth attempting a boot again, and thankfully at this point.  It all worked.  Windows did its own chkdsk again whilst starting up and we were finally in once again.

Kevin

 

 

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Arduino, ATtiny85, and Timers

April 29, 2018 at 2:57 pm (computers) (, )

I’m still playing around with using the ATtiny85 as the basis for a synthesizer, using a range of code and circuits from the Internet, but had an irritating problem today with some open code.  The author describes complete build instructions for their code and circuit for v1.5.7 of the Arduino environment and the arduino-tiny library, which as far as I can see was last updated in 2013 from its google code repository.

But I have v1.8.5 and the now easy to use, built-in support for the ATtiny85 from David Mellis (https://github.com/damellis/attiny).

So when it comes to build it on my system I get the following error:

wiring.c.o (symbol from plugin): In function `delayMicroseconds':

(.text+0x0): multiple definition of `__vector_5'

Which is obviously a linker error, but it has proven quite difficult to find a detailed hint as to what the actual problem is.  It says that it has redefined in my .ino file, but wasn’t immediately obvious this related to interrupt routines (although the word vector should have been a clue I guess).

Well it turns out that this is a problem you get if you attempt to defined an interrupt service routine twice.  The code in question had defined

ISR(TIMER0_OVF_vect)

And in any modern Arduino core timer 0 is used for the millisecond timer, as defined in hardware/arduino/avr/cores/arduino/wiring.c.  This is indeed vector 5 (see http://ee-classes.usc.edu/ee459/library/documents/avr_intr_vectors/).  This is defined in wiring.c, but not directly related to the delayMicroseconds function (oh the joys of tracing C linker errors).

I’m skipping over the part where I was attempting to work out where the actual source code being built was stored – not in <program files>\Arduino; not in my own Arduino source area; no it was finding mention of <user>\AppData\Local\Arduino15 that found any ATtiny support in my installation at all.

There seems quite a lot of confusion online (at least from the searching I was doing) about timers on the ATtiny85 and the Arduino environment.  It looks like an earlier version of the Arduino core (although not obviously in the v1.5.7 suggested by the author of the code I was using, so that is still a puzzle) had a method for changing the timer usage for different microcontrollers.

The arduino-tiny library uses a core_build_options.h options file and uses it to set the following:

#if defined( __AVR_ATtiny25__ ) || defined( __AVR_ATtiny45__ ) || defined( __AVR_ATtiny85__ )
#define __AVR_ATtinyX5__
#endif

#if defined( __AVR_ATtinyX5__ )

/*
 For various reasons, Timer 1 is a better choice for the millis timer on the
 '85 processor.
*/
#define TIMER_TO_USE_FOR_MILLIS 1

However, this isn’t in the latest builds of the core or in the version of the ATtiny core support I’m using, which doesn’t seem to have the option to change which timer is used for the delay functions.  In fact, I couldn’t quite pin down when the use of this header file disappeared from the Arduino builds, but to be honest I didn’t spend ages looking.

The code I’m trying to use needs the use of both timers, and as there are only two timers on the attiny85, hence the clash.  I’m not totally clear why it builds when the delay timer is swapped to use timer1 (as in the older arduino-tiny core), but I guess the code isn’t hanging an ISR of the other timer.

Interestingly in other code by the same author, does build ok, but in that case, even though it is installing an ISR for timer0, it is using a different vector, so it doesn’t seem to clash:

ISR(TIMER0_COMPA_vect)

So whilst you can completely mess up the functioning of the timers in your own sketch, by changing the control registers and so on directly, I haven’t found a way to clear and attach a new ISR to the interrupt.

I need to dig around a bit more now into the internals of the ATtiny timers to see how the code might be modified to support timer 1 instead of timer 0, but that will have to be a job for another day now.

Some possible options might include forgoing the use of ‘setup’ and ‘loop’ in the sketch; integrating it better alongside its use with delay; attempting to port over from triggering on overflow to triggering on compare; or I may end up trying to reverse the timer usage in the sketch (but I read somewhere that the two ATtiny85 timers are quite different, so that might not be possible).   I may end up with a special ‘hacked’ core board definition to re-specify the use of timer1 rather than 0 as per the older library, but that would be a bit of a mess…

Anyway, the upshot of all this is that this took quite a lot of untangling and googling and following dead-ends, so if you know of a definitive resource or document that details the history of ATtiny85 support within Arduino and when this changed, I’d like to hear about it!

Update: In my case it turned out that I was pretty much able to replace the use of the Timer 0 overflow interrupt with the Timer 0 compare A interrupt and get largely the same thing.  I don’t know if the two use of the different timers needs to be swapped though, but as far as I can tell right now, changing interrupt does remove the clash.

So in my case, I did this:

#ifdef ORIGINAL_CODE_
 TIMSK = (1 << TOIE0); // Interrupt on overflow
#else
 // Set compare value to same that would trigger overflow
 // of the 8-bit counter (pretty much)
 OCR0A = 0xff;
 TIMSK = (1 << OCIE0A); // Interrupt on compare with OCR0A
#endif

and then later on, when defining the ISR:

#ifdef ORIGINAL_CODE_
ISR(TIMER0_OVF_vect) {
#else
ISR(TIMER0_COMPA_vect) {
#endif

Of course there may still be other side effects, but I need to dig into the details to see.

Kevin

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ATtiny85 Synth from Jan Ostman

March 31, 2018 at 3:38 pm (computers, music) (, , , )

I’ve wanted to make a simple synth for a while and stumbled across the excellent DSPSynth site from Jan Ostman, which provides a range of designs for Euro-module compatible synthesizer modules.  One thing that really caught my eye was the CZ1 chip which implements the Casio Phase Distortion method of sound synthesis (I used to have a Casio CZ synth).  The chip is based on an ATtiny85 and the code is available as open source along with a circuit design here: https://janostman.wordpress.com/the-3hp-paperface-euro-modules/

Unfortunately, being a bit of an ATtiny85 novice, it wasn’t totally clear to me quite how to put this together from the bits and pieces I had lying around.  So this is by way of documenting how I got this doing based on the circuits and code from dspsynth.eu.

Note you can buy pre-built modules and kits from the site with proper pcbs and “paperface” front modules which all look very smart.  But as I was just tinkering I wanted to see how much I could get going myself.

And of course massive thanks to Jan Ostman for doing all the hard work and publishing the designs in the first place.

Building the Synth

Parts list for me:

I originally grabbed a couple of very cheap “ATtiny85 devboards” off ebay that include a micro-USB connection, but these turned out just to be a way of powering the boards, not programming them.  I tried using an Arduino as an in-circuit programmer, but in the end the Sparkfun programmer was so easy to use, I just use that now all the time.

dspsynth provides two circuits related to the CZ1 chip.  On the main HP3 paperface module page is a complete euro-module compatible circuit including power regulator and jacks for inputs and outpus.  In the “CZ1 manual” is a much simpler circuit that just shows a simple output stage as follows:

dsp-cz1

So I used this as my output side.  For the inputs, I took two 10k pots connected to the input pins via a 22k resistor each as shown in the full dsp paperface circuit (but without the jack connectors).

The whole thing was powered using the 5v and GND pins from one of those cheap USB “devboards” I mentioned, although I didn’t use that to host the ATtiny85 itself as they aren’t really breadboard friendly.  I did need a simple 8-pin socket adaptor to breadboard adaptor to seat the ATtiny85 nicely though.  Pics below.

2018-03-31 16.04.292018-03-31 16.05.112018-03-31 16.05.17

2018-03-31 16.03.58

Programming the ATTiny85

The source code is provided here: http://www.dspsynth.eu/files/code/pdvco.ino.  The official module uses the TinyAudioBoot system which allows you to upload firmware over one of the audio inputs.  I didn’t bother with that for my tinkering, so I was just loading the pdvco.ino source directly using the Arduino IDE and the Sparkfun programmer.

One thing that had to be done was “set the fuses”.  As I say, as a ATTiny85 novice, this took a bit of googling.  But it turns out all I really needed was to set the internal clock for the device to 16MHz (I uploaded the code without this step and there were some very interesting audio effects coming out of the thing – as you’d expect the digital to analogue conversion was all off sync).

If you select the right parameters in the Arduino IDE (ATtiny85; Clock: Internal 16MHz) and then select “burn bootloader” this has the effect of setting the fuses for the clock speed.  At this point, when the code fired up it all seemed to work and sounded a lot better.

Next Steps

Now I’ve had a bit of a play and an see what the ATtiny85 can do, I plan to explore some more of his designs.  Of particular interest is seeing if I can create a MIDI in to CV module using the principles in his USB MIDI to CV interface. But I want real MIDI so will be experimenting with the serial ports on the ATTIny85 (and worrying about getting MIDI to 5v input levels).

Once again, many thanks to Jan Ostman for publishing these designs and letting people like me have a play with DSP synthesis with such a cheap and available microcontroller from a starting point of relatively little knowledge about such things.

Kevin

 

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Repeated iPad Activation Requests

July 30, 2017 at 2:54 pm (computers) (, , , , )

I had a recent problem with an iPad.  It was asking to be activated, yet when you walk through the menus, it wouldn’t connect to the Apple servers and activate, it would only get kicked back into action when connected to a PC running iTunes.

Once activated, all was fine – Internet fine, browsing and apps, fine – apart from iTunes itself.  For some reason it was never able to get in touch with the App Store from the iPad itself.  After a while, it would then get stuck back in the ‘your iPad requires activation’ loop.  This could take a few hours or it might be after a day.

Typical error messages included: “activation error”, “ipad could not contact activation server”, “ipad could not connect to iTunes”.

The one that usually came up once trying to activate the device manually was “Your iPad could not be activated because the activation server is temporarily unavailable. Try connecting your iPad to iTunes to activate it, or try again in a couple of minutes”.

The Internet has various reasons for this – the server really is unavailable, your Internet connection isn’t working, and in some cases there was a report of activation problems after an iOS update.  There are various suggested solutions too – reboot, connect using a PC (which solves it in my case but only temporarily), remove the account from your iPad and add it back in, or even factory reset and restore from backup.  Nothing worked for me.

As I was contemplating a factory reset, I noticed that the clock on the iPad was out.  For some reason automatic updating of the clock from the Internet was turned off and the iPad was a hour out compared to the actual time.  Once the time synchronisation was turned back on and the clock updated, it all worked again.

I know that many cryptographic protocols can be time sensitive – if the clocks are out by too much between the two devices trying to communicate securely then the connection can not be established.  This is a problem I had with a Windows machine once – when the clock out of sync it wouldn’t ever update.  Looks like the same was probably happening here.

So if you are having odd activation errors on your i-device that keep reoccurring, check your clock settings and make sure it is telling the right time and in the right time zone.  This isn’t something I’ve seen mentioned anywhere in response to activation problems.

Kevin.

 

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Creating a wireless Pi-LITE from a XinoRF and LoLShield

January 2, 2017 at 11:22 pm (computers) (, , , , )

I have a few of the neat 868MHz radio modules from, what I still think of as, Nottingham based Ciseco (who became WirelessThings, who got acquired and then unfortunately ceased to be).  These are really simple serial-to-sub GHz radio modules that were available in a range of form factors based around their SRF module.  I particularly liked the RasWIK kit, which made a wireless link between a Raspberry Pi and their Arduino-based XinoRF board absolutely trivial using their Slice of Radio daughter card for the original RPi.  It came with components and tutorials to get you started with simple wireless I/O.  I also supported their kickstarter for the very easy to use SRF Shield for the Arduino and before that for the Pi-LITE.

You can still find some documentation for their modules on GitHub, under Ciseco and later WirelessThings, but most of the information about their modules seems to have disappeared with the company.  It isn’t even in Google’s cache anymore and archive.org didn’t mirror the site due to their robots.txt configuration.

If you are interesting in sharing what you do know about the modules, then there is an OpenPI Google Group where people have come together to share what information they have about the Open PI product aimed at simple wireless sensor applications.  I’ve also managed to track down as much as I can myself from the far-flung corners of the Internet, so I’m still able to tinker with their modules.

One product that was fun to use was the Pi-LITE, a Raspberry Pi GPIO board (for the original Pi) that had an on-board Arduino controlling a matrix of 126 LEDs.  It even made TheRegister.  It is basically an implementation of Jimmie P Rogers LoLShield for Raspberry Pi.  They also provided a LoLShield themselves for the Arduino alongside a version of the original LolShield library.

The Pi-LITE has a simple serial-port interface that displays anything you type as scrolling text on the LEDs. You can also send commands to set pixels as required.  You can run the Pi-LITE code on an Arduino with a LoLShield and poke it via the serial port, so I wanted to see if I could combine it with a XinoRF and get a wireless link running to it.

2017-01-02 18.40.54.jpg

The XinoRF is basically Ciseco’s Arduino Uno clone with a built-in SRF radio module.  This means that if you enable the radio (by setting D8 HIGH) then anything sent over the serial port automatically gets sent over the SRF radio too.  So if you have another SRF radio at the other end, e.g. the Slice of Radio module for the Raspberry Pi, or the SRF Stick USB for a PC, then you should be able to send commands to the Pi-LITE too.  But there are a few problems getting to this point, due mainly to the unavailability of the Ciseco documentation now, and due to the fact that the original LoLShield, on which the Ciseco board is based, is hosted on a site that Google tells you is hosting malware.  So information was a little hard to come by!

Issues:

  • The USB SRF Stick apparently has a driver, yet any site still selling them links back to the original Ciseco site, which is no more.  Solution: turns out Windows 10 is quite happy with recognising the CC1110 USB interface supported by the SRF Stick as a serial port.  If this had failed, I was going to try to find a copy of usb_cdc_driver_cc1111.inf, which seems to be all the actual “driver” really consists of.  I betting on this being a generic TI CC1110 device driver or something and google does return a few of them kicking around … your mileage may vary on this one – as I say, I didn’t need it!
  • A key tool for talking to and configuring the SRF Stick, or in fact any SRF based radio, is the XRF Configuration Manager tool from Ciseco.  Again, their site is no more, and whilst the XCM source is available on GitHub, the tool itself is not.  S0lution: As luck would have it, at the time of writing, there is still a live download link on the original ciseco site for this, see: http://www.ciseco.co.uk/downloads/XCM/install.htm
  • The XinoRF uses the UART and D8 to control the radio.  What is the LoLShield using and will they clash?  It is hard to find out as all implementations of this shield from Ciseco, Adafruit and others all refer to the original apparently-malware-ridden site.  Solution: using a web2pdf converter, I was able to read the original design documentation and schematic and found that yes, the LoLShield using Charlieplexing for the LEDs, does use all digital pins apart from 0 and 1 (the UART) so there is a clash with D8.

lol_shield_schematic.png

  • Is there an alternative to using D8 to control the radio on the XinoRF?  Well there is very little that I’ve been able to find about the SRF configuration and XinoRF, but there was an obscure reference in an index file of an archive site that captured snippets of a bit of discussion about this from the original openmicros.org forums:

“Pin 8 conflict – OpenMicros.org
Hi It s possible to move the radio enable pin from pin 8 to another pin youll need a soldering iron Looking at mine I think it s the RF EN pad I cant find mention of it in the docs and I m not familiar with how Matt do you know what the procedure is Hi On our shop advert is the link to the schematic hope this helps.  Hi Does that imply that the XinoRF won t work with your LED Matrix Shield I went through the docs for the shield before ordering one today and there it said Arduino R3 and Xino but looking at the rest of the docs it seems pin 8 would be required for it as well Does the documentation refer to an older Xino model then.  The LED Matrix docs will be talking about the Xino Basic not the XinoRF You can modify the XinoRF s radio enable pin to use something other that pin 8 Just to the left of the ATMega chip are two gold pads under the RF EN label Between the pads is a very small trace cut this with a Stanley blade use a continuity meter to check that there is no connection between the pads Solder a length of wire to the”

I doesn’t complete the sentence however.  The XinoRF schematic shows this RF-EN tag, which connects D8 from the Atmega328 to the SRF module via a resistor:

io8_iso-io8

And this can clearly be seen on the board:

2017-01-02 18.41.50.jpg

Solution: break the link between the tag as hinted in the forum post and solder a link wire to the left hand side (SRF-side) to connect to a stray +5v source on the board somewhere else (e.g. the IOREF pin or +5v from the ICSP header).  This will enable the radio by default.  Even though the SRF is a 3.3v module, the tags are on the 5v logic Atmega side (and from what I’ve read, the CC1110 has “5v tolerant” I/O pins even though it uses 3v power?  Not totally sure about that and haven’t dug out the data sheet to check, as it doesn’t seem necessary in this case anyway as in use, the tags can be measured as +5v regardless).

2017-01-02 21.18.15.jpg

At this point, downloading the Pi-LITE Arduino sketch to the XinoRF and plugging in the LoLShield is all that is required to get a wireless Pi-LITE.  To test, I used the serial monitor from the Arduino IDE to show what the XinoRF is doing directly using serial-over-USB, and I used the XCM serial monitor via the SRF Stick to show the same is happening over the wireless serial link.

Attached is a copy of the Pi-LITE users guide (B040 PiLite User Guide.pdf).  I’ve collected a number of documents about the Ciseco radio products, from cached or archived versions of their pages or from old ‘saved webpages’.  Hopefully some of this information will resurface over time.  It would be a shame to lose it.

Kevin

 

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Updating Windows Update when Windows Update Won’t Update

December 21, 2016 at 9:39 pm (computers) (, , , , )

I’ve recently picked up a reconditioned Acer Iconia W510 Windows 8 Tablet PC with a docking keyboard, and to be honest, I actually quite like it.  But it is proving a bit of a trial to get going.

First, I found that it wouldn’t activate or start updating at all.  No matter what I did, it wasn’t happy.  Reading that Windows 8 is no longer supported, and I’d have to update to Windows 8.1, I looked for it in the Windows store.  But it won’t install from there without a pile of recent updates being installed first, but updates were having problems too.  Worried that I might have to reinstall from installation media, I set about looking for the Windows Product Code, but it was nowhere to be found.  Nothing on the box, nothing on the device, nothing with the installation and recovery media.

It turns out that many modern devices just come with a Windows Product Key in the BIOS itself.  There isn’t an obvious way through the standard Windows interface to find out what it is either. It might be in the BIOS, I don’t know I didn’t get that far.  This simple utility from nirsoft will dig out any product keys on a running system and tell you what they are.

Before all the pain of a reinstall though, I wondered if Windows Update might kick the activation off, so tried that a last time.  But that was still failing consistently with error 80072F8F.  Apparently you might get this if your PC clock is too far out of sync with Microsoft’s update servers.  Sure enough, even though the time and date were correct, the year was 2012 not 2016.  Fixing that kicked off both activation and updates, so all was looking good.

Sure enough, post first bought of updates I could now install Windows 8.1 from the Windows Store, which went through successfully.  I did wonder about skipping ahead to Windows 10, but Microsoft now want around £90 for the upgrade, which is a bit mad on a device like this.

At this point though, I soon hit another problem.  Windows Updates kept stalling permanently “checking for updates”.  There isn’t a clear “this is how you fix this” on the Internet, but the general Wisdom seems to be that there is an issue with high CPU usage and hangs of the Windows Update service on Windows 8.1 that needs the Windows Update service components themselves to be updated.

So, in short I tried all the following to no avail:

  1. Just leaving it running.  Some people suggest it might perk up after 20 hours.  Some say leave it 24 hours.  I left it running for around 30 hours (after realising I needed to change the power settings to stop the device auto sleeping after 10 minutes) and still nothing.
  2. Resetting Windows updates by stopping bits, wuauserv, cruptsvr; renaming the c:\windows\SoftwareDistribution directory; running the Troubleshooter to Troubleshoot issues with Windows Updates; then rebooting.  No effect.
  3. Tried booting into safe mode to see if that helps.  Note to self: Before trying Safe Mode for a Windows tablet, check that the docked keyboard and touch screen will still function when in Safe Mode.  For the Acer, they only way to interact with it was via an external USB keyboard (using the micro-USB socket too)!! Doh!
  4. I found that KB3102812 claims to fix it, but this relies on installing KB2919355 which itself seems to rely on KB2919442.  Downloading and running these separately invokes the wusa.exe executable, but this too hangs on the “searching the PC for updates” stage.  I left one of these going for around 6 hours.
  5. During the course of my travels I also stumbled across KB2950153, which describes a problem with wusa.exe freezing, but once again trying to install this isn’t trivial without wusa.exe which itself still hangs.  At this point I was running the Performance Monitor to spot disk activity and sure enough you can see the svchost hosting the Windows Update service trawl through the SoftwareDistribution area, updating logs, caches, db files and so on – but eventually all disk activity just stops and the check is still not complete.
  6. Next on the hitlist was finding a way to install an update manually without relying on the Windows Update GUI or wusa.exe.  One promising avenue is the PSWindowsUpdate module for PowerShell.  This gives  fairly comprehensive access to Windows Update from PowerShell.  Following the instructions here, but using the Get-WUInstall -Verbose command to see what is actually going on, this never seemed to get past the “Trying to connect to Windows Update Server” stage (I tried with both -WindowsUpdate and -MicrosoftUpdate options).

Finally, before seriously considering a reinstall, I looked up any other way possible to install a Windows update without needing wusa.exe.  Eventually I found this site which shows how you can expand a .msu file and use Pkgmgr to install the .cab file directly.  Now this is not without its risks – this is bypassing all the good configuration and dependency management that the Windows Update service does behind the scenes, but things were getting desperate.

To be sure, I started looking at the versions of some of the files on the system, so I could which updates might already be installed.  I was looking at the version of wusa.exe and wups2.dll files in c:\windows\system32.  From what I could see, I think I must have already included the two dependent installs from KB2919422 and KB2919355, so I figured I might be able to get away with installing KB3102812 directly, which is supposed to fix the performance issues.  As I say, this is not without risk, but the chances were looking good that if I could just force the update of the Windows Update Service, I might be on to something.  So the steps eventually were:

  1. Check versions of the files to give some assurance that older, dependent service updates where probably already included in my Windows 8.1 installation.
  2. Download the (in my case) x86 version of KB3102812.
  3. Open a command line (using the “Run as Administrator” option).
  4. run the following commands:
cd \Users\me\Downloads
mkdir temp
expand -f:* “Windows8.1-KB3102812-x86.msu” temp
cd temp
start /w Pkgmgr /ip /m:Windows8.1-KB3102812-x86.cab

This took a few minutes, but eventually looked like it had done something and told me I had to reboot to finish the installation (after also telling me that use of pkgmgr was deprecated).  Sure enough, on rebooting I got the familiar “Configuring Windows” display and once running again, I could see from the dates in the c:\windows\system32 that quite a few Windows Updates related files had been updated.  Curiously not wusa.exe though …

At this point, I ran Windows Update as normal, whilst watching disk activity again using the Performance Monitor, and yes, after quite a few minutes, it finally declared I had 213 updates to install and proceeded to download and install them.

Phew!

Fingers crossed, this has now got me up and running and past the irritating, Microsoft-acknowledged bug, that exists in Windows Update for Win 8.1 that, infuriatingly, they only seem to provide a fix that requires installing via said problematic Windows Update.  Talk about chicken-and-egg!

Update on the updates: once all 213 were installed successfully, there were 7 additional updates and 10 optional updates. Thought I’d get it fully up to date so selected all 17. Turns out that one of the optional updates causes a perpetual shutdown-reboot cycle.  Also turns out that it is nigh on impossible to use F8 on a Windows 8 PC to enter safe mode – hence I guess why you set it using msconfig.  Thankfully I was able to use the Acer boot menu to start the troubleshooter and restore from a system restore point. Unfortunately it was the restore point prior to the 213 and the manual fix … Off we go one more time then … But really, an update that shuts down before you can even type CTRL-R msconfig?  Really Microsoft??  Moral of the tale-once it’s running ok, create a manual restore point and create a system image backup pretty quickly!

Update on the update on the updates: Of course Microsoft removed the backup and restore options from Windows 8 that let you create a system image so you have to use the command line wbadmin tool …

Kevin

 

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